source: installer/java/src/router.config.template @ 451f4c5

Last change on this file since 451f4c5 was 451f4c5, checked in by zzz <zzz@…>, 16 years ago

fixed typo on timestamper, keep NetMonitor? off by default

  • Property mode set to 100644
File size: 8.8 KB
Line 
1# I2P router configuration
2# Created on ##NOW##
3
4# TCP configuration, for inbound TCP/IP connections
5##_router_hn##
6##_router_port##
7##_router_lavalid##
8# unless you really really know what you're doing, keep listenAddressIsValid=false
9##_router_tcpdisable##
10
11# maximum number of TCP connections we will want to
12# attempt to establish at once (each of which
13# requires a 2048bit DH exchange)
14i2np.tcp.concurrentEstablishers=5
15       
16# Polling HTTP configuration, which is used to keep your router's clock in sync
17# [also for communication when no inbound connections are possible, once its fixed up again]
18##_router_phttpreg##
19##_router_phttpsend##
20
21# The following option specifies whether the router wants to keep the router's internal time in sync
22# with the PHTTP relay's clock (which should be NTP synced).  If however you are sure your local machine
23# always has the correct time, you can set this to false (but your clock MUST be synced - see
24# http://wiki.invisiblenet.net/iip-wiki?I2PTiming for more info.
25i2np.phttp.trustRelayTime=true
26
27# I2CP client port, for client connections
28i2cp.port=##_router_i2cp_port##
29
30# I2P router administrative web port (currently only responds to /routerConsole.html)
31router.adminPort=7655
32# Bandwidth limits
33# These limits are for all i2np connections - tcp or whatever
34# They are hard enforced with no smoothing.
35# XXX Until the 0.3.2 release, these should NOT BE USED.  Their values will be ignored!!!
36i2np.bandwidth.inboundBytesPerMinute=##_router_inbps##
37i2np.bandwidth.outboundBytesPerMinute=##_router_outbps##
38
39# Publish peer rankings
40# If true, include the current liveliness and reliability rankings in one's published RouterInfo data
41# Setting this to true will help debug the network and is especially useful while we'return still testing
42# However, traffic analysis may be easier with this data published (though there's no reason to think people
43# can't just fake the info in this).
44# Since we're still very much < 1.0, this will be true for the current release by default.  As we get some
45# network helth information and tune the ranking algorithms, this will become false by default. 
46# You, of course, can change this to either true or false whenever you'd like.  This is only read
47# on router startup though, so you need to restart the router if you change it.
48router.publishPeerRankings=true
49
50# Keep message history
51# This series of options can help out in debugging the network by keeping a
52# seperate log of all messages sent over the network (but without any personally identifiable information)
53# This is entirely optional, but would be greatly appreciated during the
54# development phase of the network since it would allow the developers to detect
55# errors much more easily
56router.keepHistory=false
57
58# Submit message history
59# This option works only if router.keepHistory is true and periodically sends
60# in the router history logs to the developers (specifically, it submits the file
61# via HTTP POST to http://i2p.net/cgi-bin/submitMessageHistory - you can see a sample of what
62# one of those files looks like at http://i2p.net/~jrandom/sampleHist.txt)
63# After submitting this file, it deletes the local copy (otherwise the file will grow
64# without bound - tens of MB per day)
65# Again, this is entirely optional, but would be greatly appreciated as it should help
66# out the development process
67router.submitHistory=false
68       
69# If your router is really slow, you'll need to update the following job parameters
70
71# limit the maximum number of concurrent operations
72router.maxJobRunners=1
73
74# if a job waits more than this amount of time (in
75# milliseconds) before running, spit out a warning
76router.jobLagWarning=8000
77
78# if a job waits more than this amount of time (in
79# milliseconds) before running, kill the router
80router.jobLagFatal=30000
81
82# if a job takes more than this amount of time (in
83# milliseconds) to run, spit out a warning
84router.jobRunWarning=8000
85
86# if a job takes more than this amount of time (in
87# milliseconds) to run, kill the router
88router.jobRunFatal=30000
89
90# wait until the router has been up for this long
91# (in milliseconds) before honoring any fatalities
92# since during startup, jobs are run sequentially
93# and CPU intensive tasks are needed
94router.jobWarmupTime=600000
95
96# Target clients
97# How many concurrent clients the router should prepare for
98# This, factored in with the tunnel settings, determines the size of the pools -
99# too many, and your machine consumes excessive CPU and bandwidth, too few and your
100# clients take too long to startup. 
101# e.g. If you are running an eepsite, an eepProxy, an irc proxy, and a squid proxy, set this to 4
102router.targetClients=2
103
104# Number of inbound tunnels per client
105# This determines how many inbound tunnels will be allocated per client at a time.
106# This is a key factor in the reliability of a client receiving messages
107# As above, too many and your machine gets hosed, too few and the pool is slow. 
108# 2 should be sufficient - prior to 0.2.5, we have all had only 1
109tunnels.numInbound=2
110
111# Number of outbound tunnels per client
112# This determines how many outbound tunnels must exist when a client is in operation.
113# XXX Not currently enforced - ignore this setting
114tunnels.numOutbound=2
115
116
117# Depth of inbound tunnels
118# This determines the length of inbound tunnels created - how many remote routers to
119# include (0 means no remote routers, 3 means a total of four routers, including
120# the local one, etc).  This is a key factor in the reliability and anonymity
121# provided by I2P
122# Users should simply leave this as 2 for now, at least until the tunnels are more reliable (post 0.3)
123tunnels.depthInbound=2
124
125# Depth of outbound tunnels
126# This determines the length of outbound tunnels created - how many remote routers to
127# include (0 means no remote routers, 3 means a total of four routers, including
128# the local one, etc).  This is a key factor in the reliability and anonymity
129# provided by I2P
130# Users should simply leave this as 2 for now, at least until the tunnels are more reliable (post 0.3)
131tunnels.depthOutbound=2
132
133# Tunnel duration
134# This determines how long tunnels we create should last for (in milliseconds).  Too
135# long and they are more prone to failure, too short and people need to do more network
136# database lookups.  The default of 10 minutes (600000 ms) should be used
137# You should not change this setting unless you really know what you're doing
138tunnels.tunnelDuration=600000
139
140# Max waiting jobs
141# If your router is getting heavily overloaded (due to slow CPU or excess network
142# activity), your router's performance will seriously degrade, increasing its
143# load further and delaying any messages sent through your router.  The max waiting
144# jobs configuration parameter is a throttle, saying that if there are more than
145# that many 'jobs' that want to run ASAP at any given time, additional jobs may
146# be summarily dropped.  That will reduce your load and cause others to reduce
147# their dependence on you (further reducing your load).  The default value of 40
148# should be sufficient, but may be increased if desired.  Less than 20 is not
149# recommended, as certain normal events can queue up 10 or so jobs at a time
150# (all of which only take a few milliseconds).  Leave this alone unless you know
151# what you're doing
152router.maxWaitingJobs=40
153
154#
155# the remaining lines describe how you can get your router to fire up client
156# applications it is up and running, all within the router's JVM.  Uncomment the
157# ones you want (revising the numbers and ports accordingly)
158
159# Keep the router's clock in sync by querying one of the specified NTP servers once
160# a minute (uses UDP port 123)
161clientApp.0.main=net.i2p.time.Timestamper
162clientApp.0.name=Timestamper
163clientApp.0.onBoot=true
164clientApp.0.args=http://localhost:7655/setTime?k=v ntp1.sth.netnod.se ntp2.sth.netnod.se
165
166# SAM bridge (a simplified socket based protocol for using I2P - listens on port 7656.  see
167# the specs at http://www.i2p.net/node/view/144 for more info)
168clientApp.1.main=net.i2p.sam.SAMBridge
169clientApp.1.name=SAMBridge
170clientApp.1.args=0.0.0.0 7656 i2cp.tcp.host=localhost i2cp.tcp.port=##_router_i2cp_port##
171
172# EepProxy (HTTP proxy that lets you browse both eepsites and the normal web via squid.i2p)
173clientApp.2.main=net.i2p.i2ptunnel.I2PTunnel
174clientApp.2.name=EepProxy
175clientApp.2.args=-nocli -e "config localhost ##_router_i2cp_port##" -e "httpclient 4444"
176
177# Network monitor (harvests data from the network database and stores it under
178# monitorData/, and with the netviewer GUI you can browse through its results)
179#clientApp.3.main=net.i2p.netmonitor.NetMonitor
180#clientApp.3.name=NetMonitor
181#clientApp.3.args=
182
183# Heartbeat engine (ueber-simple ping/pong system, configured in heartbeat.config.  By itself
184# it just writes out stat data where its told to, but there's a seperate HeartbeatMonitor
185# GUI to let you visualize things)
186#clientApp.4.main=net.i2p.heartbeat.Heartbeat
187#clientApp.4.name=Heartbeat
188#clientApp.4.args=heartbeat.config
Note: See TracBrowser for help on using the repository browser.